Ngā hakari tū o Matariki

Chef Joe shares mātauranga around foraging kai from the whenua, the ngahere and the moana.  

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Whakatauki o te wiki

This whakatauki 'He kai kei aku ringa' which means, 'there is food in my hands.' signifies resilience, empowerment, hope and the economic self-determination of Māori.

It refers to the ability to use the skills and resources they have to create success. It's about being responsible for the resources and capabilities one needs to grow and develop. (inspiringcommunities.co.nz)

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The story of Mataroa and Niwareka

The story of Mataora recounts how he fell in love and married a tūhere (spirit) named Niwareka, from Rarohenga (the underworld). 

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Three traditional Māori cloak styles

Three traditional Māori cloak styles

Introduction

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Matariki Te Whetū o te Tau | Dr Rangi Matamua

Learn about Matariki with Dr Rangi Matamua from Living by the Stars.

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Matariki 2022 - We Begin

As the first year of official National recognition of Matariki we celebrate everyday that our people come together to share te ao Maori.

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Ngā Whetū o Matariki

Traditionally Māori used the rising of Matariki as a marker for the New Year. For the first time in Aotearoa it will be officially recognised and celebrated as a public holiday.

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Mahuika - Te Whaea o te Ahi

This has to be one of my favourite myths and legends as a child, I read the book and the pictures only enhanced the story. This video version of the story that I found on Youtube,  involves a long time great family friend of mine Ramon Te Wake.

This is an interpretation of an aspect of the Māori creation story, from Aotearoa (New Zealand), told from the point of view of Mahuika, the goddess of fire, which describes how her grandson the demi-god Māui tricked her into giving away all of her power so that he could control the light and warmth on earth.

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Whakahuahua Pronunciation

Learn Te Reo Maori - Lesson1

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History of the Māori language

Major initiatives launched from the 1980s have brought about a revival of te reo. In the early 21st century, about 125,000 people of Māori ethnicity could speak and understand te reo, which was an official language alongside New Zealand Sign Language.

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Reviving Moko Kauae

As I look at our whānau and the various tupuna paintings and photographs it is easy to see the beauty in carrying your whakapapa in such a prominent way. 

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Matariki

One of the many stories around Matariki

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